Norseman II in
                            water, from NorsemanMaritimeCom
BERING STRAIT MOORINGS 2016 Cruise
Norseman II

  7th - 15th July 2016, Nome to Nome,
Chief Scientist: Rebecca Woodgate (University of Washington, USA)

 
Corresponding author: Rebecca Woodgate (woodgate@apl.washington.edu)

An NSF-supported collaboration between University of Washington (UW)  (lead PI: Rebecca Woodgate),
University of Texas, Austin 
(Co PIs: Patrick Heimbach, An Nguyen),
with links also to Oregon State University (lead PI: Laurie Juranek and Burke Hales)
and University of Alaska, Fairbanks (PIs: Peter Winsor and Hank Statscewich)


2016 Bering Strait Mooring Cruise
2016 Norseman II Cruise Overview
2016 Cruise Map
2016 Cruise Report
PRIOR BERING STRAIT PLANS AND EXPEDITIONS
   2016 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
  
2015 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
  
2014 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - June/July
   2013 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
   Prior Bering Strait work
BERING STRAIT LINKS
   Bering Strait Basics - why is it important
   Bering Strait Oceanography (Data, cruises & more)
 


BERING STRAIT 2016 MOORING CRUISE OVERVIEW
  BERING STRAIT 2016 CRUISE MAP

As part of the Bering Strait project funded by NSF-AON (Arctic Observing Network), in July 2016 a team of US scientists undertook a ~ 8 day cruise in the Bering Strait and southern Chukchi Sea region on the US vessel Norseman II, operated by Norseman Maritime Charters.
The primary goals of the expedition were:
1) recovery of 3 moorings carrying physical oceanographic (Woodgate-NSF), whale acoustic (Stafford), and ocean acidification (Juranek and Hales) instrumentation. These moorings were deployed in the Bering Strait region in 2015 from the Norseman II. The funding for the physical oceanographic components of these moorings comes from NSF-AON.
2) deployment of 3 moorings in the Bering Strait region, carrying physical oceanographic (Woodgate) and whale acoustic (Stafford) instrumentation. The funding for the physical oceanographic components of these moorings comes from NSF-AON.
3) accompanying CTD sections (without water sampling).
4) collection of accompanying ship's underway data (surface water properties, ADCP, meteorological data).
5) deployment of an autonomous glider in the southern Chukchi Sea (Statscewich).


Despite windy and rough conditions, and often fog, all moorings were safely recovered and redeployed, and a total of 277 CTD casts (on 19 lines) were taken.  For full details, and preliminary results, see:

2016 Bering Strait Mooring Cruise Report.

Figure: Ship-track, blue.  Mooring sites, black.  CTD stations, red.  Glider deployment site, yellow.  Arrows indicate direction of travel (on inset below, blue during mooring operations before CTD survey, green during CTD survey).  Depth contours every 10m from the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) [Jakobsson et al., 2000].  Lower panels give detail of strait region at the start (left) and end (right) of the cruise.  See cruise report for daily detail. 
Map of Bering Strait 2016 Mooring Cruise

Bering Strait 2016 Mooring Cruise Report

For use of any of these figures, please contact
Rebecca Woodgate (woodgate@apl.washington.edu)

Polar Science Center, University of Washington, 2016

We gratefully acknowledge financial support for this work the National Science Foundation (NSF).
 
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