BERING STRAIT MOORINGS 2021 Cruise
Norseman II

  7th - 17th July 2021, Nome to Nome,
Chief Scientist: Rebecca Woodgate (University of Washington, USA)

 
Corresponding author: Rebecca Woodgate (woodgate@uw.edu)
An NSF-supported project at the University of Washington (UW)  (lead PI: Rebecca Woodgate, Co-PI: Cecilia Peralta-Ferriz)

2021 Bering Strait Mooring Cruise
2021 Norseman II Cruise Overview
2021 Cruise Map
2021 Full Cruise Report
2021 Full Cruise Report (high res)
PRIOR BERING STRAIT PLANS AND EXPEDITIONS
   2021 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
   2020 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - September
   2019 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - September
  
2018 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - August

   2017 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July

   2016 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
  
2015 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
  
2014 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - June/July
   2013 Norseman II Mooring Cruise Report - July
   Prior Bering Strait work
BERING STRAIT LINKS
   Bering Strait Basics - why is it important
   Bering Strait Oceanography (Data, cruises & more)
 

BERING STRAIT 2021 MOORING CRUISE OVERVIEW
  BERING STRAIT 2021 CRUISE MAP

As part of the Bering Strait project funded by NSF-AON (Arctic Observing Network), in July 2021 a team of US scientists undertook a ~ 11 day cruise in the Bering Strait and southern Chukchi Sea region on the US vessel Norseman II, operated by Support Vessels of Alaska, Inc..
The primary goals of the expedition were:

1) recovery of 6 moorings carrying physical oceanographic (Woodgate & Peralta Ferriz -NSF) and whale acoustic (Stafford) instrumentation. These moorings were deployed in the Bering Strait region in 2019 and 2020 from the Norseman II. The funding for the physical oceanographic components of these moorings comes from NSF-AON.

2) deployment of 3 moorings in the Bering Strait region, carrying physical oceanographic (Woodgate & Peralta-Ferriz) and whale acoustic (Stafford) instrumentation. The funding for the physical oceanographic components of these moorings comes from NSF-AON.

3) collection of trace metal/nutrient water samples using a pumped system at selected CTD casts (Jensen)

4) a set of CTD sections studying water properties in the region (Woodgate & Peralta-Ferriz)

5) collection of accompanying ship's underway data, viz. surface water temperature and salinity, ADCP velocity data and meteorological data (Woodgate & Peralta-Ferriz),

6) deployment of a glider (Statscewich).

The cruise loaded and offloaded gear in Homer, Alaska, and people in Nome, Alaska. As a Covid precaution, the science team quarantined in Fairbanks for 10 days prior to the cruise and transferred to the ship via a private air charter flight

Key Statistics:
- 6 moorings recovered, 3 moorings deployed,
- 276 CTD casts on 14 CTD lines,
- trace metal/nutrient water samples taken on 41 stations,
- 1 glider deployed.

For full details, and preliminary results, see:

Bering Strait
                2021 Mooring Cruise Map
  Ship-track, blue. Mooring sites, black. CTD stations, without (red) and with (green) trace metal/nutrient sampling, Consecutively numbered arrows show direction of travel (on this figure, green marking CTDing lines, cyan marking transit). Depth contours every 10m from IBCAO (International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean [Jakobsson et al., 2000]. Lower panels give detail of strait region at the start (left) and end (right) of the cruise.

For use of any of these figures, please contact
Rebecca Woodgate (woodgate@uw.edu)

Polar Science Center, University of Washington, 2021

We gratefully acknowledge financial support for this work the National Science Foundation (NSF).
 
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