2002 Mooring Deployment

Photo Credit: Univsersity of Washington

Photographers: Paul Aguilar and Jim Johnson

 



Use of a stand allows Aagaard and Johnson to rotate an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP), which is comprised of a compass, battery and transducer. This operation was executed in Resolute before the trip to the Pole.
(Johnson)

 



Aagaard and Johnson calibrate the compass which is used to read current direction. Compass calibration is needed because of the weak magnetic field near the North Pole. Without calibration, current direction would be measured inaccurately.
(Johnson)

 



Stewart
joins Aagaard to continue calibration of the Doppler profiler. The transducer sends beams that provides the speed of driting sea ice, plus, a 3-dimensional profile -NSEW plus up and down- of ocean currents.
(Johnson)

 


The anchor for the mooring, a chain, weighs 1,350 lbs. When deployed it will rest 13,517 feet below the sea level. A series of cables form a line that is attached to the anchor. On the line are 3,50 pounds of instrument packages. To keep the 2.5 mile line afloat are a series of four glass floats. In addition, a large steel float, with a radio beam connected to it, functions as the top float.
(Aguilar)

 



Johnson attaches a Seabird temperature/salinity recorder to the mooring line. He and Ohmart will then lower the recorder and next section of mooring line into the sea. Hanging from the tripod are some glass floats encased in protective coverings.
(Aguilar)

 



This recovered Seabird recorder is one of seven recorders to be attached to the mooring. They are distributed along the line in order to record the ocean's temperature and salinity at various depths.
(Aguilar)